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Types of jobs in Canada

There are two types of jobs in Canada:

  • regulated
  • non-regulated

Regulated jobs, including trades

Regulated jobs are controlled by provincial, territorial, and sometimes federal laws. They are governed by a regulatory body or apprenticeship authority.

Regulated jobs are also called:

  • professions
  • skilled trades
  • apprenticeable trades

They include jobs such as:

  • architects
  • plumbers
  • engineers

These jobs are regulated to:

  • protect public health and safety
  • make sure people working in these jobs are qualified

About 20 percent of jobs in Canada are regulated.

In Canada, some provinces and territories regulate some jobs and trades while others do not. If you have a license to work in a province or territory, it may not be accepted in others.

Regulatory bodies

A regulatory body usually assesses credential recognition. Check with the regulatory body or other group for your job to find out if you need to be assessed. They can tell you which credential assessment agency you should use.

You can find out how to contact your regulatory body on Job Bank. You can also check their website to find out more about:

  • fees
  • licensing
  • eligibility
  • the process to get your credentials recognized

Working in a regulated job in Canada

To work in a regulated job and use a regulated title, you must:

  • have a licence or certificate or
  • be registered with the regulatory body for your job in the province or territory where you want to work

Each regulated job has its own requirements for getting a licence or certificate. Requirements for entry can be different between provinces and territories, but they usually include:

  • having your training and skills assessed against the job’s standards
    • this is done by comparing your training with the training provided by Canadian colleges and universities
    • you’ll need to show your original academic transcripts and other related documents, such as university course descriptions
  • having your language and communication skills tested
  • written exams, an interview or both
  • a specified period of supervised work experience

You’ll be evaluated on your own merits. Don’t compare your experience to someone else’s. Understand the requirements as they apply to your own case in the province or territory where you plan to work.

Trades

If you want to work in a trade, visit Red Seal for more details about the training, skills and experience you’ll need to meet.

Trades include jobs such as:

  • bakers
  • carpenters
  • electricians

As a tradesperson, you may be eligible to immigrate through the Federal Skilled Trades Program.

Non-regulated occupations

Some employers need job applicants to be registered or certified by the relevant professional association. Having your credentials assessed and recognized helps Canadian employers understand what you’re qualified for.

Job requirements can vary greatly between employers. Be prepared to prove that you have the education or experience to do the job. You may have to:

  • show a certain level of skill and competence
  • have a certain amount of education
  • have personal traits that suit the job

A credential assessment agency can assess your educational credentials for a fee. You may include this information in your résumé or curriculum vitæ (CV).

Source: canada.ca

If you have any more queries, you can ask your question in the forum of Canadians Live.

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